Archives for December 2014

The Mother-in-Law Battles: How Does She Really Feel? from ThirdAge.com

 There are millions of mother-in-law jokes around, but how do these supposedly terrifying figures feel about their daughters-in-law? Actually, according to a survey of 1,868 mothers-in-laws and 2,000 daughters-in-laws, conducted jointly by ThirdAge.com, the largest site for baby-boomer women, and GalTime.com, an online magazine for women, they seem to like them.

Among the mothers-in-law who answered the survey, more than60 percent see their son’s wife as either a daughter, a friend or the right woman for their son. Just 10 percent see her as the enemy. On the other hand, when asked if they actually like their daughter-in-law, the numbers change a bit. Over 50 percent said they like their daughter-in-law, but another 45 percent think that she’s just OK, dislike her some of the time, or don’t like her at all.

And daughters-in-law had some negative views of their mother-in-law. A total of 23.9 percent considered their mother-in-law as a “frenemy,” with 12.9 percent seeing her as an outright enemy.

What’s causing the friction?
Most of the time, it seems to be unsolicited advice. Almost 60 percent admit they give their daughters-in-law advice, without being asked, about a variety of subjects. One mother-in-law said, “I give advice on money, kids, jobs, vacations, cars, towel colors, Christmas presents, housekeeping, food, what TV shows to watch, when they need to mow the yard, wash their cars, cut their hair, etc.”

Still, when the relationship is good, daughters-in-law praise the mothers-in-law for being “an awesome grandma,” “an elderly girlfriend,” “a very wise, wonderful woman” and because “she defends me when her son is being a jerk.” One commented, “I hit the mother-in-law jackpot. Truly, I love my mother-in-law very much.”

And mothers-in-law frequently praise their daughters-in-laws as well for being “a great mother” and sometimes for being “my best friend.” A few try to keep a sense of humor about this complex relationship. As one mother-in-law cheerfully commented, “I am the world’s worst mother, parent, grandparent, and have done everything possible to destroy their marriage. Can’t see how they lasted 28 years.”
Read more: http://www.rd.com/advice/relationships/the-mother-in-law-battles-how-does-she-really-feel/#ixzz3NAiXts7X

Read more: http://www.rd.com/advice/relationships/the-mother-in-law-battles-how-does-she-really-feel/#ixzz3NAhcOTfj

 

Read more at http://www.rd.com/advice/relationships/the-mother-in-law-battles-how-does-she-really-feel/

 

 

Lynn’s Punch Bowl Cake

Lynns punch recipe

Lynn’s Punch Bowl Cake

1 Yellow or Strawberry Cake Mix

4 boxes of French Vanilla Pudding Mix

7 cups of Milk for Pudding Mix

1 Cherry Pie Filling

1 Can Crushed Pineapples

6 Bananas sliced

3 lbs of Strawberries sliced

1 24 oz of Cool Whip

Mix cake according to directions on box and bake in 2 round cake pans.

While cake is in oven, mix pudding according to directions with milk

Set aside in the refrigerator

Cool cake completely

In a large punch bowl, crumble half of cake in punch bowl

Spread ½ of pudding over cake, spread ½ of cherry pie filling over pudding,

Spreading ½ of pineapples over cherry pie filling, spread ½ of bananas over

Pineapples, spread ½ of strawberries over bananas, and spread 1/3 of

Cool whip over strawberries

Repeat layers and finish Cool whip

Enjoy

Holidays and the In-laws by Wilford Wooten

Holidays and the In-laws by Wilford Wooten

How have you dealt with special days like Christmas, Thanksgiving, Fourth of July, Easter, Memorial Day, and birthdays? Most of us might think only in terms of the way we grew up, perhaps with Mom and Dad, and expect these occasions to be celebrated the same way.

The only problem, now that you’re married, is whose mom and dad’s celebration of the holidays you’re going to adopt. An added challenge confronts blended families, who may have a host of combinations of relationships and traditions to consider.

One husband and wife, like many others, found themselves in a quandary. Where should they go for Thanksgiving? In an effort to respect the desires of both sets of parents and a grandmother, they ended up rushing from house to house. The result: They didn’t enjoy the food or the time together.

Sometimes practical considerations minimize this conflict. If family members live far apart, the question of where to spend the holidays may be answered when travel costs are taken into account. Often, though, the solutions aren’t quite so clear.

Premarital counseling may be the best place to start addressing this question; it’s frequently covered in that setting. Whether you discussed this important area of family relationships before you were married or are just now beginning to deal with it, here are some key concepts that can help you decide how and where to spend your holidays:

  1. Sit down with your spouse and share—orally and in writing—how each of you feels about holidays and how they’re spent. Include major national holidays, birthdays, anniversaries, and other occasions that are special to you. If it’s your family’s tradition to take a drive to see the changing autumn leaves, for instance, don’t hesitate to mention it. The same goes for marking the start of fishing season, the last day of school, or the Super Bowl.
  2. Explain how you spent the holidays as a child. Which aspects did you enjoy? Which would you like to change? If the two of you were raised in different countries or cultures, what holidays could you learn more about? For example, a spouse who grew up in England might not realize the significance of Thanksgiving and Independence Day to a mate who was raised in the U.S.
  3. Consider how your parents and other relatives may wish to have you involved. Perhaps a Christmas Eve service together is important to the wife’s parents, while Christmas dinner is central to the husband’s. Try to be open to the desires of family members—but not controlled by them.

Read more at

http://www.focusonthefamily.com/marriage/communication_and_conflict/inlaw_relationships/holidays_and_the_inlaws.aspx

 

Mothers-in-law vs Daughters-in-law By Third Age Staff

Mothers-in-law vs Daughters-in-law By Third Age Staff

There are millions of mother-in-law jokes around, but how do these supposedly terrifying figures feel about their daughters-in-law? Actually, they seem to like them, according to a survey released Tuesday.

The survey asked 1,868 mothers-in-law and 2,000 daughters-in-law what they think about each other. It was conducted jointly by ThirdAge.com, the largest site for baby-boomer women, and GalTime.com, an online magazine for women.

Among the mothers-in-law who answered the survey, more than 60 percent see their son’s wife as either a daughter, a friend or the right woman for their son. Just 10 percent see her as the enemy. On the other hand, when asked if they actually like their daughter-in-law, the numbers change a bit. Over 50 percent said they like their daughter-in-law, but another 45 percent think that she’s just OK, dislike her some of the time, or don’t like her at all.

And daughters-in-law had some negative views of their mother-in-law. A total of 23.9 percent considered their mother-in-law as a “frenemy,” with 12.9 percent seeing her as an outright enemy.

What’s causing the friction? Most of the time, it seems to be unsolicited advice. Almost 60 percent admit they give their daughters-in-law advice, without being asked, about a variety of subjects.  One mother-in-law  said, “I give advice on money, kids, jobs, vacations, cars, towel colors, Christmas presents, housekeeping, food, what TV shows to watch, when they need to mow the yard, wash their cars, cut their hair, etc.”

To read more at http://www.thirdage.com/family-matters/the-mother-in-law-battles

 

Chocolate Peppermint Crunch Brownies

peppermint brownies

 

 

 

 

This is a Hershey’s recipe that we enjoyed this holiday season. Try it for a desert for the holidays. So good.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Ingredients

  • 1 box Instant Chocolate Pudding Mix
  • 1 (18-ounce) package brownie mix
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 cup HERSHEY’S Premier White Chips
  • 1 cup ready to spread cream cheese frosting
  • 1/2 cup confectioner’s sugar
  • 1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon peppermint extract , to taste
  • 1/4 cup crushed soft peppermint candies

 

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease a 9×13-inch pan (glass pan 325°F.).

2. In a mixing bowl, whisk together HERSHEY’S Instant Chocolate Pudding Mix and brownie mix. Add eggs, oil and water and stir until well blended.

3. Pour into prepared pan and bake 20 to 23 minutes. Cool completely.

4. In a mixing bowl, whisk together melted white chips and frosting; add confectioner’s sugar and peppermint extract and mix until smooth.

5. Frost cooled brownies and sprinkle with crushed peppermints. Cut and serve. Makes 20 brownies.

Nutritional facts: 280 estimated calories per brownie

Optional: replace crushed peppermint candies with HERSHEY’S Mint Chocolate Chips

Recipe developed and owned by Jel Sert Co. for licensed Hershey product.